Who would have guessed THAT?! #adventure

Here’s a reader review on Amazon.uk about the novel Two Journeys. Get your copy here: www.clemenssuter.com/books

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Listen to this: the Tale of the Fig Leaf

A man enters a costume store. “Listen darling,” he addresses the proprietress, “I plan to attend a costume party, and I have decided to dress up as Adam, and hence I need a fake fig leaf.”

”OK,” says the woman, “Just a minute.” She disappears in the back and after a few minutes returns with a plastic fig leave.

”Sorry love,” says the bloke, “That’s too small to cover MY manhood. Don’t you have anything bigger?”

The woman shrugs and disappears, returning with a larger leaf.

”No, that is still too small.”

Grumbling, the woman disappears again, returning with a huge leaf, big enough to cover a man’s torso.

The man shakes his head: “No, no, that won’t do. It’s simply too small!”

”OK,” says the woman, “Here’s an idea, mister. If your penis is that big, why don’t you stick it in your ear and go as a gas pump?”

Here’s a SECRET you never knew. Read until the very end – and more.

Whose moon is that? I think I know.
Its owner is quite a happy bro.
Full of joy like a vivid rainbow,
I watch him laugh. I shout: hello.

He gives his moon a shake,
And laughs until his belly aches.
The only other sound’s the break,
Of distant waves and birds awake.

The moon is pale, tranquil and asleep,
But bro has promises to keep,
After cake and lots of sleep,
Sweet dreams come to him cheap.

He rises from his gentle bed,
With thoughts of aliens in his head,
He eats his jam with lots of bread.
Ready for the day ahead.

Lovely music for a Sunday afternoon – piano accompanied by “powerful” visual marketing

Found this CD by Deutsche Grammaphon in a small used-book and music shop in Utrecht, the Netherlands. The man who sold it said that it was a great choice… even though the lady on the cover looks as if her cat died. Or is she suffering from a bad hangover?

A quick internet search revealed:

Martha Argerich is a classical concert pianist from Argentine, widely considered one of the greatest pianists of all time.

Well, I stand accused. As always: great content can do without great marketing: it sells by itself.

Ten Little Known Facts About Clemens P. Suter’s Novel CELETERRA a crime mystery set in Heaven.

Are we all just part of a magnificent computer simulation?

About a year ago I was the host of a business dinner in New York, half a dozen men and women met at a fine restaurant after a day of intensive meetings. Perfect food, some great wine and a very nice group of people from hard- and software companies, the majority from the USA, some from Europe.

The conversation focused on business, but as the night carried on, turned to other topics. We discussed politics, history… and computing. These people were all computer specialists, many with engineering degrees. At a certain point the discussion turned to the theory that was humans do not exist, but instead are just avatars on a piece of very advanced hardware. This theory is not new: Elon Musk is one its proponents. It is based on the observation that computers are becoming more and more advanced as well as that the distinction between virtual reality (VR) and reality seems to be disappear. Some time in the far future, somebody will be able to create a computer that doesn’t just simulate a human brain (which according to some estimates may be possible in 50 years or so), but the brain of all humans. It is just a matter of scale; throw in some quantum computing, sufficient hardware and real-time analytics with deep machine learning, and it should be possible to do this.

We could thus easily just IMAGINE that we are physically alive, today and here on this planet; whereas in reality we are just characters in a very advanced computer game played by a acne-faced teenager 200 years in the future. Everything that we experience; all pain and war and suffering and all love and rewards and happiness would then only be part of a simulation.

Little speaks against this theory from a technical standpoint: as long as technical progress continues (to accelerate) at the same pace it has for the last 150 years, this is easily imaginable. This is naturally also a weakness of the theory: life on Earth as well as history hardly ever were linear (although this may seem so to us: we only experience a very small fragment of all of history, yet we think it is all encompassing). For instance, about every 1000 years or so, a major volcanic eruption happens, which tend to dramatically alter the progress of humanity’s culture. Nevertheless one could argue that such catastrophes might delay the development of a super VR computer, but delay doesn’t mean that it could never be created.

So why do I still think there is no value in the theory that we are all just part of a very advanced computer simulation? At the Free University of Amsterdam where I studied biology many years ago, one of the highlights of the first year was a course in Philosophy and Methodology  of Natural Sciences. I have forgotten the professor’s name, but the man did a tremendous job at hammering home some basic scientific principles. Thus, the main argument is that although the simulation theory MIGHT be true, there is NO way to prove or disprove it; it is a theory that isn’t falsifiable. By what criteria could anyone prove that we are, or are not part of a simulation? After all, at some timepoint, the simulation would be so perfect that it couldn’t be identified as a simulation anymore. It is similar to stating that we are created by an invisible fairy living at the bottom of our garden – a theory that people may shrug at, or ridicule, but which would be very hard to prove or disprove. And, as my professor taught us, non-falsifiable theories have, from scientific point of view, no value.

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